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Volkswagen Simulates Battery Molecules With Quantum Computing

Volkswagen has harnessed quantum computing to simulate  industry relevant lithium hydrogen and carbon molecules. Now they want to simulate more complex molecular chains so that they can eventually improve and speed up the battery fabrication process via automatic adjustment of design to optimize weight reduction, maximum power density, and cell assembly.

Volkswagen Uses Quantum Computing to Develop EV Batteries

By modelling the entire chemical process of a battery before testing it physically, you reduce much of the work and needless waste of materials. Quantum computing is renown for its ability to simulate atomic-molecular systems.

Martin Hofmann, CIO of the Volkswagen said “We are focusing on the modernization of IT systems throughout the Group. The objective is to intensify the digitalization of work processes – to make them simpler, more secure and more efficient and to support new business models. This is why we are combining our core task with the introduction of specific key technologies for Volkswagen. These include the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence, as well as quantum computing.”

Ideally all of the testing would be accomplished via molecular simulations so that the amount of physical testing and fabrication of prototype is reduce,

Volkswagen is presently working with Google and it’s “D-Wave model” on quantum computer development in San Francisco and Munich.

Florian Neukart, Principle Scientist at Volkswagen’s CODE Lab in San Francisco, says: “We are working hard to develop the potential of quantum computers for Volkswagen. The simulation of electrochemical materials is an important project in this context. In this field, we are performing genuine pioneering work. We are convinced that commercially available quantum computers will open up previously unimaginable opportunities. We intend to acquire the specialist knowledge we need for this purpose now.”

 

06/07/18 Volkswagen tests quantum computing in battery research

 

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